17 Replies to “Apollo 11 Moon Landing CBS News Coverage”

  1. Had Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin failed to liftoff from the moon and were stranded on the surface forever. This is what Richard Nixon was prepared to say to the nation:
    Fate has ordained that the men who went to the moon to explore in peace will stay on the moon to rest in peace.
    These brave men, Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, know that there is no hope for their recovery. But they also know that there is hope for mankind in their sacrifice.
    These two men are laying down their lives in mankind’s most noble goal: the search for truth and understanding.
    They will be mourned by their families and friends; they will be mourned by their nation; they will be mourned by the people of the world; they will be mourned by a Mother Earth that dared send two of her sons into the unknown.
    In their exploration, they stirred the people of the world to feel as one; in their sacrifice, they bind more tightly the brotherhood of man.
    In ancient days, men looked at stars and saw their heroes in the constellations. In modern times, we do much the same, but our heroes are epic men of flesh and blood.
    Others will follow, and surely find their way home. Man’s search will not be denied. But these men were the first, and they will remain the foremost in our hearts.
    For every human being who looks up at the moon in the nights to come will know that there is some corner of another world that is forever mankind. 
    After that speech Houston would have ordered Mike Collins to leave his crew mates behind on the moon and return to earth.

  2. GOD MADE THE WHOLE UNIVERSE LIKE IT IS ….NO ONE I SAID IT AGAIN NO ONE CAN BE MORE CLEVER THAN GOD..EVEN WITH ALL THE GENIUS INCTHIS WORLD WORKING TOGHETHER THERE IS NO WAY A HUMAN BEING CAN SET HIS FOOT ON THE MOON…

  3. Cronkite was so out of it over the event that he completely missed the critical computer alarms minutes before the landing, instead blathering on without listening. Schirra never did his homework and had no idea what they were either, so he just bullshitted his way through Cronkite's question when it finally dawned on them that something serious was going on. When the animation stops long before the actual landing, neither one realizes that the landing has gone on far longer than anticipated and fuel is critically short. I remember as a 9 year old kid being very aware that fuel was about to run out.

  4. I even remember the CBS program intro 0:001:30. "Man On The Moon" was the thematic direction of the CBS coverage, and Cronkite was required to repeat it often. The other networks never gave their special programming a "name."

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